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As a good manager and coach, should you be liked or feared—or neither?

A recent LinkedIn (LNKD) discussion that I read supported the premise that respect is really the goal. I noticed that most members of the group Human Resource Management felt that in order to garner respect, being liked is indeed better than being feared—but that at times some fear of authority is necessary to get the job done.

Power Thrives on Respect

One contributor likened the employer-employee relationship to a parent-child scenario: “You may hate me now, but you’ll appreciate me later.” In the business world, the greater good of the company sometimes necessitate unpopular decisions. But managers can’t execute them without a foundation of respect.

How do you earn respect as a manager?

Don’t abuse influence. As a manager in a position of power, you may begin to feel all-knowing. That’s exactly when you need a reality check. Be on the lookout for signs that your staff members are withdrawing, not communicating: “checking out.” If so, you may have tipped the scales to the power-monger side, and it’s time to move to center.

Set the tone. Remember the phrase “stop, look, and listen” that you heard as a child? As simplistic as it sounds, this applies to management as well. Acknowledging the ideas of your team and listening—not just passively hearing—will make you a better manager. “I’ll consider your suggestion” will help everyone become more engaged and productive.

Run a humanized workplace. A humanized workplace is a collaborative environment in which all workers put the good of the company before themselves. It is not a corporate playground rampant with bullying or sandbox politics. You can help lead the way to a respectful workplace that maintains a sense of family or community—a place where management not only tolerates but encourages fun and humor.

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Your email address will not be published.

As a good manager and coach, should you be liked or feared—or neither?

A recent LinkedIn (LNKD) discussion that I read supported the premise that respect is really the goal. I noticed that most members of the group Human Resource Management felt that in order to garner respect, being liked is indeed better than being feared—but that at times some fear of authority is necessary to get the job done.

Power Thrives on Respect

One contributor likened the employer-employee relationship to a parent-child scenario: “You may hate me now, but you’ll appreciate me later.” In the business world, the greater good of the company sometimes necessitate unpopular decisions. But managers can’t execute them without a foundation of respect.

How do you earn respect as a manager?

Don’t abuse influence. As a manager in a position of power, you may begin to feel all-knowing. That’s exactly when you need a reality check. Be on the lookout for signs that your staff members are withdrawing, not communicating: “checking out.” If so, you may have tipped the scales to the power-monger side, and it’s time to move to center.

Set the tone. Remember the phrase “stop, look, and listen” that you heard as a child? As simplistic as it sounds, this applies to management as well. Acknowledging the ideas of your team and listening—not just passively hearing—will make you a better manager. “I’ll consider your suggestion” will help everyone become more engaged and productive.

Run a humanized workplace. A humanized workplace is a collaborative environment in which all workers put the good of the company before themselves. It is not a corporate playground rampant with bullying or sandbox politics. You can help lead the way to a respectful workplace that maintains a sense of family or community—a place where management not only tolerates but encourages fun and humor.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.